Regulatory Translations:
Expertise, Uncertainty and Affect
in Transnational Legal Fields

May 16 – 18, 2013
Boğaziçi University Rectorate Hall
Thursday, May 16
9.00-9.15

Opening Remarks

  • Andrea Ballestero
    Rice University
  • Z. Umut Türem
    Boğaziçi University
9.15-10.45

Panel 1 Translation through dense semiotic ranges

  • Jothie Rajah
    American Bar Foundation

    Bedeviled Rule of Law: Translating Law’s Authority in a Post-9/11 World

  • Andrea Ballestero
    Rice University

    What is in 3%? Calculation as the Chronotope of Human Rights in Translation

  • Yasmine Chahed
    London School of Economics

    Translation at the intersections of law and accounting

11.00-12.30

Roundtable 1- Difference as the precondition of translation?

Difference of many sorts instantiates the need for a process of translation whereby the law comes into being. This panel will explore the types of differences that translation presumes and the ways in which such difference might be troubled, or not, in the contemporary. How is the process of translation deemed necessary in the first place? What regulatory problematic does translation resolve? And, does regulatory translation make sense at all in a world that many scholars deem as increasingly standardized.

  • Philip Liste
    University of Hamburg
  • Peer Zumbansen
    York University
  • Ann Janette Rosga
    Transpositions Consulting, California
14.00-15.30

Panel 2 Law, Economies and Markets translating each ohter

  • Alfred Aman
    Indiana University

    Translating Markets into Law and Law into Markets: What is Lost and Found in Translation

  • Kregg Hetherington
    Concordia University

    Regular Soybeans: Ontological Politics in the Rise of a Mega Crop

  • Z. Umut Türem
    Boğaziçi University

    Competition in Translation: Informing the Self and Political Economy

16.00-17.30

Roundtable 2 – The translation of value(s) through norms

This roundtable explores processes where translation of value(s) is explicitly address. How does the law activate the desire for values in translation? How is value circumscribed, on the first place, so that it can be translated? Here, value takes different forms from such as patentable entities, constitutional orders, environmental protection.

  • Laura Foster
    Indiana University
  • Iza Hussin
    University of Chicago
  • Katharina Mangold
    Goethe University
  • Şahin Ardıyok
    ACTECON Consulting
Friday, May 17
9.00-10.30

Panel 3 Assembling scales of law and regulation through translation

  • Iza Hussin
    University of Chicago

    Circulations of Law: Indian Ocean Networks and Trajectories of the Muslim State

  • Philip Liste
    University of Hamburg

    The Spatial Knowledge of Transnational Human Rights Litigation

  • Katharina Mangold
    Goethe University

    The Persistence of National Peculiarities: Translating Representative Environmental Action from Transnational into German Law

11.00-12.30

Roundtable 3 Topologies and Topographies of Translation

The law continues to think of itself largely as a geography-based project. Tying jurisdiction partially to space, legal problematics emerge when conventional jurisdictions, such as municipalities and even states, can no longer stabilize legal problems for their “resolution.” This roundtable will explore translation as a means to stabilize/disrupt space as a foundational legal principle. How does taking translation, as an epistemic practice seriously, transform the notion of space that the law relies upon? And, to what effect?

  • Andrea Ballestero
    Rice University
  • Alfred Aman
    Indiana University
  • Jothie Rajah
    American Bar Foundation
  • Tuna Kuyucu
    Boğaziçi University
14.00-15.30

Panel 4 The foreign and the native as fields for translation

  • Laura Foster
    Indiana University

    Techniques of Refraction: Scientific Regulatory Translations
at the Limits of Patent Law and Benefit Sharing in Southern Africa

  • Ann Janette Rosga
    Transpositions Consulting, California

    Semantic Disappointment: Why the Incommensurability of a Cultural Study of Law and the Practice of Human Rights Advocacy Needn’t Actually Be Disappointing

  • Peer Zumbansen
    York University

    Sociological Jurisprudence 2.0: Updating Law’s Interdisciplinarity

16.00-17.30

Roundtable 4 Disciplinary practices of translation

How do we come to understand the ontological politics of different modalities of translation while taking seriously the disciplinary tools and instruments on which practitioners rely? How do specific disciplines, in the sense of regimented modalities of thought, open or foreclose regulatory regimes? This roundtable examines the politics of knowledge forms as experienced by practitioners working from diverse social locations. It juxtaposes techniques of regulatory translation and highlights the diversity and multiplicity of those techniques to ponder whether and how can we remain attentive to the peculiar implications of each of those techniques.

  • Yasmine Chahed
    London School of Economics
  • Kregg Hetherington
    Concordia University
  • Umut Turem
    Boğaziçi University
  • Yavuz Mavioğlu
    ADMD Law Office
Saturday, May 18
9.30-11.00

Open discussion: common threads and critical reflection on translation as a concept to think with.

  • Alfred Aman Jr.

    Logistics about Special Issue of the Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

11.30-12.00

Concluding Remarks

  • Alfred Aman Jr.
    Maurer School of Law, Indiana University
  • Andrea Ballestero
    Rice University
  • Z. Umut Türem
    Boğaziçi University